Pre-Symposium Events

There are several exciting pre-symposium events this year; plan your travel so you can get in a day early and take part in these excellent professional development and educational opportunities.

Please note, some presymposium events have associated fees.

Computing for the Social Good in Computer Science Education

  • Organizers: Michael Goldweber; Lisa Kaczmarczyk
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway H (2nd floor)

Computing for the Social Good: Educational Practices (CSG-Ed), is an umbrella term meant to incorporate any educational activity, from small to large, that endeavors to convey and reinforce computing’s social relevance and potential for positive societal impact. Are you a CSG-Ed practitioner? Present your work at this mini-symposium. Not a CSG-Ed practitioner - attend and learn how to become one! This FREE SIGCAS sponsored mini-symposium is an opportunity for CSG-Ed practitioners to present their projects/practices and meet like minded colleagues. The goal is for current and future CSG- Ed practitioners to share acquired wisdom, discover new collaborators, and review lessons learned. Furthermore, we will discuss how we can grow the CSG-Ed movement with a focus on attracting and supporting educators who value the impact of CSG-Ed.

Details and submission instructions at: http://www.sigcas.org/csged/

Did we mention that this is a FREE event; sponsored by SIGCAS?


Development and Visualization of Computing Competencies

  • Organizers: Alison Clear; Allen S Parrish; John Impagliazzo
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway A (2nd floor)

This event presents an overview of the Computing Curricula 2020 (CC2020) project with a focus on visualization. CC2020 seeks to generate a modern revision of the well-known CC2005 document by reflecting a more current view of computing. Further, CC2020 proposes a competency-based characterization of computing, as well as a bottom-up organization of computing into its sub-disciplines based on an analysis of competencies. Existing computing disciplines for which curricular reports exist include computer engineering, computer science, cybersecurity information systems, information technology, and software engineering. Emerging computing disciplines are data science and artificial intelligence. This event imparts the results of the project to date and offers the opportunity for participants to infuse new ideas on the current computing disciplinary landscape, particularly as it relates to visualization models useful for industry, students, and academia.


Department Chairs Roundtable

  • Organizers: Mary Lou Maher; Ran Libeskind-Hadas
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway B (2nd floor)

Additional fee required, more information available at https://sigcse2019.sigcse.org/attendees/chairs-roundtable.html.


Broadening Participation in Computing, Amplifying Efforts in Rural Communities (now a track with RESPECT)

  • Organizers: Deborah Seehorn; Chris Dovi; Rebecca Dovi; Sarah Dunton; Dave Frye; Jayce R. Warner
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 6:30 PM
  • Room: Millenium: Grand Ballroom

Rural communities are faced with unique sets of challenges and opportunities. In order to build equitable pathways and achieve Computer Science for All, rural communities need to be recognized for their work, and provided with the tools and resources to stay connected to local and national Computer Science for All initiatives. The BPC for Rural Communities track at RESPECT will dive into the realities of expanding computer science and broadening participation in rural schools and communities. Bringing together state CS leaders, advocates, and researchers, the pre-symposium will focus on developing scalable strategies that will support and engage rural communities in the push for CS education. Come and learn from experienced states who are part of the ECEP Alliance, https://ecepalliance.org/, and have initiated efforts to broaden participation in computing in the rural areas of North Carolina, Texas, and Virginia.

This session will inform participants of the different strategies that each state is pursuing to broaden access and participation to computing education in the rural communities in their states. Participants will define the opportunities and challenges in their own state and develop a strategic plan for addressing BPC in their own rural communities.

This session has merged with the RESPECT conference, which requires a separate registration. Visit their website for more information: http://respect2019.stcbp.org/.


What to Teach about Accessibility

  • Organizers: Richard E. Ladner; Andrew J. Ko
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway C (2nd floor)

This workshop will be for faculty and prospective faculty who want to learn in more depth about teaching accessibility. There will be short presentations by people who already teach accessibility topics in various courses such as app and web development, machine learning, computer vision, natural language processing, and human-computer interaction. After these presentations there will be ample time to break into small groups based on teaching topic to go into more depth about what to teach, when teaching about accessibility.

Registration required: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/blaser/364182.


2019 CSAB Computing Accreditation Workshop

  • Organizers: Mary Jane Willshire-Fairley; Liz Glazer
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway D (2nd floor)

At CSAB's Computing Accreditation Workshop, CS, IS, IT, Cybersecurity, and general computing faculty and administrators learn the ins and outs of preparing for a Computing Accreditation Commission/ABET visit, including

  • the purpose and content of the self-study,
  • the benefit of an ABET readiness review,
  • best practices in display materials,
  • understanding the criteria and terminology,
  • and visit logistics.

The workshop is led and facilitated by experienced CAC/ABET visit team chairs and CSAB leaders. This year’s workshop will cover the new general and program criteria that will be used to evaluate all CAC/ABET programs from 2019 forward. (You can find the criteria at http://www.abet.org/accreditation/accreditation-criteria/cac-criteria/.) This is the only comprehensive accreditation learning opportunity of its kind for computing degree programs. The fee is just $150, including continental breakfast, lunch, and materials.

Updates and a link to register can be found at http://csab.org/workshops.html.

Direct link to register: <a href=https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07efvj0e1ba9b2f81d&oseq=&c=&ch="">https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07efvj0e1ba9b2f81d&oseq=&c=&ch="</a>


CS Education Infrastructure for All II: Enabling the Change

  • Organizers: Clifford A. Shaffer; Peter Brusilovsky; Kenneth Koedinger; Stephen H. Edwards
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway E (2nd floor)

CS Education makes heavy use of online educational tools like IDEs, Learning Management Systems (LMS), eTextbooks, and interactive programming environments. Many interactive, auto-assessed exercises, referred to as "smart content", are now available. Instructors and students would benefit from greater inter-operability between these tools. CS Education (CSEd) researchers increasingly make use of large collections of data generated by click streams coming from such tools. However, students, instructors, and researchers all face barriers that slow progress: (1) While the standards are improving, educational tools still do not integrate well. (2) Information about computer science learning process and outcome data generated by one system is not compatible with that from other systems. (3) Computer science problem solving and learning (e.g., open-ended coding solutions to complex problems) is quite different from the type of data (e.g., discrete answers to questions or verbal responses) that current educational data mining focuses on. This NSF-supported workshop is the second in a series of SIGCSE presymposium events in support of the SPLICE project. The goal of SPLICE is to support and better coordinate efforts to build community and capacity among CSEd researchers, data scientists, and learning scientists toward reducing barriers. CSEd infrastructure should support (1) broader re-use of innovative learning content instrumented for rich data collection, (2) formats and tools for analysis of learner data, and (3) development of best practices to make collections of learner data available to researchers. We will present progress on active collaborations and working groups, and plan activities for the coming year.

More info: http://cssplice.org/SIGCSE19Workshop.html.


POSSE Roundup

  • Organizers: Gregory W Hislop; Grant Braught; Darci Burdge; Heidi Ellis; Stoney Jackson; Cameron Macdonell; Lori Postner
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway F (2nd floor)

This workshop will explore approaches to student participation in HFOSS that provide more scaffolding and control for instructors taking initial steps with students. The discussion will focus on two areas:

  • Sandbox HFOSS projects - Current software development tools allow snapshots of entire projects to be saved and then used to provide static "sandbox" environments to support demonstration and practice of HFOSS skills. These sandbox projects can be paired with community-developed learning activities to make it easier for instructors to teach open source skills and practices.
  • Faculty-controlled HFOSS projects - There are a handful of cases where faculty are the core contributors to open source projects. Student participation in these projects may have a different dynamic that can improve predictability and instructor control over student participation.

At the workshop, short presentations will summarize existing work in these areas. Breakout groups will generate ideas for application of these approaches in specific courses, and create specifications and prototypes of learning activities to support the identified uses.

POSSE, the Professors’ Open Source Software Experience, prepares instructors to guide student participation in Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software (HFOSS) projects. This POSSE Roundup is a workshop for instructors who have previously attended POSSE, or who have open source experience including contributing to an open source project.

Additional information is available at: http://foss2serve.org/index.php/SIGCSE_2019_POSSE_Roundup.


Peer Teaching Summit

  • Organizers: Jeffrey Forbes; Kristy Elizabeth Boyer; Ketan Mayer-Patel
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway G (2nd floor)

The Peer Teaching Summit will bring together Computer Science (CS) faculty and peer teaching leaders who are seeking resources, tools, and strategies for training and supporting peer teachers for large enrollment CS classes. Undergraduates can be employed in support of a department’s teaching mission to improve student engagement, learning, and retention - particularly among students from groups underrepresented in CS. Summit participants will discuss how their program uses undergraduates as teaching assistants, section leaders, lab assistants, mentors, and tutors. In describing their programs, participants will share best practices, lessons learned, and relevant research in sessions on: (1) structuring undergraduate peer teaching programs, (2) recruiting and selecting undergraduate TAs, (3) training undergraduate peer teachers and leaders, and (4) evaluating undergraduates as teachers. This summit will connect faculty and peer teaching leaders who are interested brainstorming and sharing tools and strategies for peer teaching programs.

More information: http://www.peerteaching.org.


Teaching Cybersecurity in CSP (or Any CS Class): Introducing the Security Mindset

  • Organizers: Maritza Johnson; Daniel D. Garcia; Julia Bernd; Serge Egelman
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway A (2nd floor)

Cybersecurity is vital to a technology-driven society. Daily headlines demonstrate that we cannot ignore the potential security risks inherent to our increasingly more networked lives. Cybersecurity is a growing job field -- but even for students that don’t go on to pursue cybersecurity careers, it is crucial to have some level of security awareness! But until very recently, young people were usually not introduced to the intrigue and opportunity of cybersecurity until advanced undergraduate CS courses. However, the real world implications and applied nature of the topic lends itself well to engaging a wide audience, key to catching the interest of a diverse group of students in CS at a younger age.

We have developed a series of lessons that introduce the broad idea of cybersecurity through threat modeling and the human-centered nature of authentication. They are prepared by subject-matter experts with research backgrounds in the technical workings and social implications of cybersecurity. While our lessons were specifically designed to meet the cybersecurity learning objectives in the AP Computer Science Principles framework, they are appropriate for any high school computer science class.

This will be an interactive workshop for CS educators at all levels; no previous cybersecurity experience required. (Laptops also optional.) Participants will learn how to begin developing the “security mindset” by teaching students a simplified version of threat modeling. We will also preview lessons on authentication and social engineering. In addition, the workshop will provide opportunities for attendees who teach cybersecurity learning objectives to share their own strategies.


What!? You want me to include computing ethics, too!??!! Using the ACM Code of Ethics in technical computing topics

  • Organizers: Don Gotterbarn; Michael S. Kirkpatrick; Marty J. Wolf
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway H (2nd floor)

In the updated ACM Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct (http:ethics.acm.org), there is an explicit acknowledgment that ethical analysis is an essential part of computing professionalism. Developing this skill set requires giving students an early introduction and regular exposure to ethical considerations and reflective analysis of technical projects. One way to accomplish this is through the deliberate and proactive incorporation of the Code’s values and guidance into all levels of existing curricula. Modifying technical exercises to provide regular exposure to ethical considerations and reflective analysis helps students move beyond the temptation to view “ethics” as a compliance check at the end of a project or course or someone else’s responsibility.

This session is designed to help educators use the Code to integrate ethical considerations into the technical learning objectives of a wide range of core technical courses. Ethical issues discussed in any class should naturally emerge from the class subject matter. Using their own technical assignments, this session will address the needs of teachers and faculty who are tentative about incorporating computing ethics into existing technical courses.

Using a mixture of lecture, small group activities, and discussion, we will present fundamental ethical concepts, methods for teaching computing ethics, and help participants apply strategies for modifying their existing assignments so that ethical considerations are learned along with technical topics. We will also discuss logistical concerns for teaching computing ethics, such as grading strategies.

More info: https://ethics.acm.org/sigcse2019.


Computer Science Principles Providers and Teachers Forum

  • Organizers: Lauren Mock; Michael Ball; Daniel D. Garcia; Tiffany Barnes
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway G (2nd floor)

The CS Principles Providers and Teachers Forum is the inaugural gathering of CS Principles educators, providers and teachers in a structured session at SIGCSE. This forum was created to fill the need for a community for CS Principles providers and teachers to discuss best practices, feedback, or share teaching experiences. The CS Principles Providers and Teachers Forum aims to increase collaboration and discussion among College Board endorsed providers and teachers by offering a diverse agenda.

Email: sigcse-csp-forum@bjc.berkeley.edu for more information.
Registration: https://bjc.berkeley.edu/sigcse-csp-forum/register

Proposal Submissions

: https://bjc.berkeley.edu/sigcse-csp-forum/submit


FREE Cybersecurity Curriculum

  • Organizers: Melissa Dark; Blair Taylor; Siddharth Kaza; Maureen Turney
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway I (2nd floor)

This 4 hour hands-on workshop is designed for faculty who are new to teaching cybersecurity, as well as faculty who are expanding what they teach in cybersecurity. The primary goal of this workshop is to show faculty cybersecurity curriculum, labs and other resources developed under the National Cybersecurity Curriculum Program, funded by the National Security Agency, as well as other NSF funded curriculum projects. In this workshop, faculty will learn about NCCP and the curriculum materials that have been produced, peer reviewed, and published for public use in CLARK (Curriculum Library and Resource Knowledge Base). Attendees will set up accounts in CLARK and explore and get hands-on practice with modules, labs, and videos on topics such as secure coding, SCADA, privacy, adversarial thinking, and many more. Interested faculty will also have the opportunity to learn about joining a community of practice to advance cybersecurity education at their home institution. Suitable for educators of all levels and disciplines.


Professional Development Workshop for Teaching-Track Faculty

  • Organizers: Lori Pollock; Christine Alvarado; Barbara Ryder; Mark Sherriff
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Room: Hyatt: Greenway J (2nd floor)

Computer Science departments have experienced significant course enrollment increases and today many departments graduate the largest number of CS majors in their history. With fewer than a third of the new PhDs in CS seeking academic positions, the field faces a serious faculty shortage. Many Ph.D. granting departments have introduced or increased the number of academic teaching faculty positions that have academic rank and typically no tenure. The one-day workshop will focus on the professional development of teaching track faculty (professor of practice, instructor, clinical faculty, lecturer, etc.) in Ph.D. granting departments. The workshop fills a crucial need as many departments have limited experience on how to mentor, evaluate, and promote this new type of faculty. The sessions will focus on how teaching faculty can strategize their involvement in departmental as well as research activities, different forms of scholarship and leadership activities to pursue, and best practices for success, promotion, and advancement. Academic leaders involved in supervising and evaluating teaching track faculty will provide their perspective and insights.

Intended Audience: This event is targeted at teaching-track faculty in Ph.D. granting departments. The focus will be on TTF teaching large enrollment undergraduate courses and individuals relatively new to the teaching profession. It is not intended for graduate students, post-docs, individuals seeking a teaching position or individuals wanting to learn teaching practices and challenges. Some of the participants from the 2018 workshop will likely be panelists. We will give preference to applicants who have not previously participated, but we will not exclude repeat participants.

To apply to attend the workshop or for more information, please go to: https://cra.org/crae/activities/teaching-track-faculty-sigcse-2019/


RESPECT/RPPforCS

  • Organizers: Ji Eun Kwon
  • Date: 2/27/19
  • Time: 8:30 AM - 6:30 PM
  • Room: Millenium: Grand Ballroom

Understanding how to apply fundamental computer science problem solving skills is quickly becoming a required competency. It is critical to address issues of equity and inclusion so that we can engage all people in learning key concepts in computing. The Fourth Annual Conference on Research in Equity and Sustained Participation in Engineering, Computing, and Technology (RESPECT) is intended to serve a premier venue for peer-reviewed research on broadening participation in computing. Since broadening participation research is inherently interdisciplinary, we invite contributions from computer science education, educational leadership, learning sciences, cognitive or social psychology, social sciences, and related disciplines. All papers should explicitly state their motivating questions, relate to relevant literature, and contain an analysis of effectiveness. Research papers should adhere to rigorous standards, describing hypotheses, methods, and results. Experience reports should carefully describe the context and provide a rich reflection on what worked, what didn’t, and why. RESPECT 2019 will be organized as a joint meeting with RPPforCS, a community of awardees for NSF CS for ALL Researcher Practitioner Partnerships (RPP), and will be co-located with the ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE) as a pre-symposium event on February 27, 2019 in Minneapolis, MN. As in previous editions of the conference, the RESPECT 2019 proceedings will be submitted for inclusion to IEEE Xplore and will be submitted for cross-indexing in the ACM Digital Library.

Requires separate registration, visit their website for more information.


Questions

If you have questions about anything discussed above, please contact the Pre-Symposium and Affiliated Events Liaison Chair.